Master Package Graduate destined for great things

, , , , , , , , ,

Miles Campbell presented the “Superstar” Award at Fall 2018 Graduation for being the first student to complete all eight programs

It was a special day for 19 year old Miles Campbell as he walked up to the stage to accept a “Superstar” award for being the first student at Slam Academy to complete and graduate from all eight offered programs.  And, he was able to do it in under two years, while attending college full time. What’s his secret to success? We were able to catch up with the rock-star graduate for a personal interview on how he got started, what he gained from training, and what’s next on the horizon.

 

A conversation with Miles Campbell:

Tanya Lano, Slam Aacademy:

What first brought you to Slam Academy? What was your background experience prior to starting classes at Slam Academy? What goals did you have set at that time when you started classes?

Miles:

When I first started producing, I was 12 years old. I needed to find somewhere I can learn this. I googled “how to produce music” and Slam Academy came up in my search. I reached out, and started taking private lessons with James Patrick (Co-Founder) when I was 16. When I was a senior in high school, I decided what I wanted to do. We toured other schools, then I came to Slam Academy. I loved music my entire life, I love EDM, and have a huge passion. Minneapolis has a great music scene and Slam Academy is only 15 minutes away from where I live. The more I came here, the more it felt like a community and a home. It’s a family here. I wanted to take my music to a professional level. I worked hard to get all of those classes done.

SA:

You completed the DJ program first, why? And, what made you open your mind to taking all programs?

Miles:

I was DJ’ing a lot, and wanted better gigs. My full time job during high school was DJ’ing. I was making more money DJ’ing than my first part-time job so I quit. I was performing for high school events, Trampoline Park, and other random events. I feel the DJ program  is a good start for everyone. I also wanted to master Ableton Live so I took that with Sound Design. If you know Ableton Live and Sound Design, everything else can be built around these programs. Everything ties together.

SA:

How did you handle taking classes at your college and Slam Academy at the same time?  How did you structure your busy calendar to balance two schools? Why do you feel completing all 8 programs is beneficial?

Miles:

I took 26 credits in my freshman year of college, as well as classes at Slam Academy. I did mostly online classes for college, and I took night classes when I didn’t have classes at Slam. During breaks, I would do homework. I stayed busy and didn’t waste time. I didn’t hang with friends, just focused on myself. I stayed focused, but I’m not organized. I found a system and stuck with it.

Just recently I’ve been nominated and chosen to open for Steve Aoki at U of M homecoming. Seeing your hard work pay off is inspiring.

SA:

How do you handle stress and pressure?  Are you ever overwhelmed with work? How to you create balance for yourself?

Miles:

I try to remind myself stress will pass. You gotta keep working to overcome obstacles in life. Keep pushing forward. If you let yourself fall backwards, it’s harder to get back up. I just go for it. I feel overwhelmed all the time. I just transferred to a major University and still trying to work on music. I want to release music.

SA:

Do you feel Slam Academy got you where you want to be?

Miles:

Slam Academy went above and beyond. I did not expect to play my first gig at Skyway just 2 months after I started classes. It all happened so fast.  All the people I’ve met have completely changed my life.

SA:

What advice can you give future students that also desire to win a “Superstar” award? Are you collaborating with Slam Academy students?

Miles:

Work hard and keep at it. If I can do it, you can do it. Stay excited and inspired. Pull inspiration from the people in your class and the environment around you. It won’t seem like work, and it will just be fun

I’ve been collaborating with Forest Vlaming (Slam Academy Master Package Student) and worked on a tons of different ideas and business plans. We had a lot of classes together. Talking to other people that are in similar stages of their career and are hungry for success, just like I am, is very good. It’s hard to meet other people that are into the same thing as you are, so meeting tons of them at Slam was crazy. I felt in high school I was the only one doing this.

SA:

What’s next for Miles Campbell?

Miles:

I’m working on my first single, working on new music, getting ready for upcoming gigs, joined the EDM club at U of M, and helping to teach there. And, I expect more. I want to do music full time. That’s the goal.

SA:

Congratulations, Miles.

Miles:

Thank you very much.

Miles Per Hour

 

SoundCloud:
https://soundcloud.com/
milesperhour-1

FaceBook:
https://www.facebook.com/
milesperhourmusic/

Instagram: @mph_music
Twitter: @MPH_Music

Past gigs: https://www.facebook.com/events/2126147074286946/

David Birrow awarded Innovation in Music Education Award

Teacher, Clinician & Percussionist, David Birrow leads by example

David Birrow has been named the first recipient of Slam Academy’s new annual Innovation in Music Education Award for being a leader in implementing technology in every class as a way to empower his students to create, learn and communicate. Birrow will receive the award during a school assembly at Breck School on December 18th

Birrow currently teaches in Minneapolis for the MacPhail Center for Music and Breck School. He is a percussionist, teacher and licensed educator with experience teaching K-12 general music in both public and private schools as well as individual and group percussion instruction. Birrow attended the Frost School of Music at the University of Miami and earned a Bachelor’s degree in Music with a major in Music Education. He then earned a Master’s of Music degree in Instrumental Performance from the University of Minnesota. He has also written a new book about how to teach bucket drumming, properly titled: The Bucket Book.

Birrow teaches courses to students in grades 5-12 in Music Production, Music Theory, Music Psychology, Video Editing, World Music, and Film Music. Birrow’s classrooms are hands-on, active places where students are situated as composers, DJs, editors, musicologists and performers.

“Technology also allows students to self-differentiate how they work in class,” said Birrow. “They also learn about the history of electronic music.”

 

Students construct their own knowledge as they remix songs, perform experiments, code video games, and play music. In his 7-8 grade Digital Music class, students learn how to DJ, produce house and techno tracks, and perform on synth instruments. Students get their hands on MIDI keyboards, DJ controllers, and electronic drums as they learn about melody, harmony, rhythm, and form. They use Garageband, Hydrogen Drum Machine, and Audacity to create music in several genres. After creating a new song, students post their compositions on a class website, allowing their classmates to listen and provide feedback.

http://www.davidbirrow.com

 

 

Innovation in Music Education Award (IMEA) Purpose & Mission:

The Slam Academy Innovation in Music Education Award was created to showcase innovative uses of music technology in pre-college education. Slam Academy believes that educators who effectively embrace such technologies are preparing students for a future not only as musicians, but as technologically-astute citizens.

Slam Academy has always offered students various vocational programs in music production, music theory and performance, and with David’s teachings to middle and high school students, this will help nurture and prepare our Slam Academy students to round out their education with industry and career advancing concepts, including production, music theory, music business, composing, sound design, recording engineering and DJ’ing.